For Any Cough Old Or Fresh

March 27th, 2018

TAKE a quartor of a pound of blew currans an ounce of Anyseeds and a penny worth of liquorish makeing it and your seeds first into powder then beat your currans to a kind of a conserve strewing in your powder as you beat them then take of the best maiden honey you can gett putting thereof as much as will moisten all this seting it on the fire let it simer a while but not to long lest it be clammy so take from the fire and keep it for your use. take it as oft as you please upon the poynt of a knife the quantity of a nutmeg.

Source: A Book of Simples, H.W. Lewer

How to make a Cordial for Colds

March 10th, 2017

First, prepare a quart of the juice of black currants, by bruising and boiling them for twenty minutes, and then straining off the juice with great pressure through a sieve into a basin. Next, boil four ounces of linseed in a quart of water until reduced to one-third of its original quantity, taking care that it does not boil fast, and, when done, strain the liquid into a very clean saucepan; add the currant juice, two pounds of moist sugar, and half an ounce of citric acid, or one pint of lemon juice; boil all together until reduced to a thick syrup—that is, when it begins to run rather thick from the spoon without resembling treacle; as soon as the syrup has reached this stage, remove it from the fire, and pour it into a jug to become quite cold. This syrup will keep good for any length of time, if bottled and corked down tight, and kept in a cool place. A tea-spoonful taken occasionally will soon relieve the most troublesome cough.

This cordial may also be prepared in winter, using for the purpose black currant jam, or preserved black currant juice, instead of the juice of fresh-gathered currants.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli